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Instructional Writing and Resources 

 

01/

Every course has an underlying pedagogy, just as every instructor is guided by one. I have come to believe it’s an instructor’s duty to examine — and a student’s right to know — the pedagogical assumptions that shape their educational practices. This letter is my attempt to explain the pedagogical underpinnings of the course you are enrolled in and how they guide my facilitation of it...

02/

Genuine concern for social equity and justice has too often been absent from public affairs education. Public policy and public administration often neglected their complicity (both as a professions and academic fields) in perpetuating racism and other forms of oppression. The titles of works that buck the trend expose many scholars’ abdications. Examples include Jennifer Alexander’s Avoiding the Issue: Racism and Administrative...

03/

This post outlines basic guidelines for graduate-level writing in my classes. I don’t expect you to have these customs mastered at our semester’s outset, but I do expect you to practice them in course writing. Becoming an effective writer is a lifetime effort—I hope these guidelines aid you in that pursuit...

04/

Long an important aspect of the research process, peer review can be a valuable educational exercise which offers authors critical feedback, affords reviewers constructive criticism practice, and helps foster a more collaborative learning environment. As with any aspect of graduate-level writing, effective peer reviewing is a learned skill...

05/

This post offers a curated list of podcasts relevant to public affairs, including matters of civics and governmental affairs, public policy, public administration, nonprofit organizations, and social enterprise. This is a “living” list — I encourage you to respond to this story with any suggestions I may have missed. I’ll revise the catalogue on a regular basis

Image by John Fowler

Syllabi and Course Materials

 
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